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Woe of the Crow (Digital)

5.00 out of 5 based on 3 customer ratings
(3 customer reviews)

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3 reviews for Woe of the Crow (Digital)

  1. 5 out of 5

    :

    I just want to thank you for posting such amazing covers and original tracks on youtube. I personally love your cover of Ozzy’s “Life Won’t Wait.” Your singing is right up their with Layne Staley’s its haunting yet beautiful. Its refreshing to know a voice like yours exist in a rather mundane music world. You are skilled mad man on the guitar and drums (and the other instruments I may not even be aware of). Props to you for surfacing great music friend.

  2. 5 out of 5

    :

    I’m very surprised your music isn’t viral or out there! You produce excellent music I can’t wait what Vagus Nerve Has in store for us! Keep up the good work -Daniel

  3. 5 out of 5

    :

    The first thing I noticed listening to this record was the percussive drive. I don’t merely mean drums, but rather the dynamics of every instrument as they play off of each other. Yes, the vocals are fucking great, and the guitars are perfect for the album, but something about the ‘percussive’ nature of this album hit me hard – and is the first thought I have when I remember ‘Oh, I should queue up one of those badass songs today at the gym!’ Very creative and very enjoyable to listen to.

    ‘Bottle of Medicine’ is a perfect example of a well-written and balanced song that still strives to take creative liberties. This polished, layered dynamic rocker screams radio-worthy. The key to the Phyllotaxis songwriting or ‘sound’ is that Ravi knows when to hold back on a song and let it breathe, and knows when the instruments need to crescendo together to hit the listener hard. Again, ‘Bottle of Medicine’ illustrates this great as verses are intertwined by a simplistic ticking clock, providing a sense of pensive stillness while simultaneously building a tension towards the chorus. And what a chorus! – anthemic, simple vocal melodies and straightfoward reliable lyrics make this song easily on the top of the list for songwriting. The second half of the chorus hook, melodically singing ‘What a sick and twisted irony, that it’s a bottle of medicine’ with a beautifully descending melody and syncopated guitar/drums is just SOLID songwriting. Hard to believe it’s all written by one person!

    For a softer side, I’d recommend ‘Show Yourself’. This one is a prime example of the musical range on this record. Maybe it’s my sentiment for the traveller-on-the-road intro acoustic guitar – an almost celtic vibe about it- but this song is always a welcome listen when it pops up on my playlist. What starts as a vocally soft plea for solace, builds upon itself with waves of harmonies, layers of soft piano and swelling guitars, eliciting a cautious sense of optimism in what would otherwise be melancholic subject-matter. This is a song that deserves multiple listens, and if you take the time to dig into each layer you’ll discover new meanings.

    Frankly, Most of the songs on the album have some effect like this – multiple listens lets this album appreciate in value. Colustrum (Acoustic) takes this notion literally, remixing an existing song to be a more raw, stripped down to bare elements: Acoustic guitar, tribal drums, and simple harmonies (you might even notice VOX taking the place of conventional percussion). The result of this altered perspective of a song is equally impressive.

    Final note for listening: Check out the album-synonymous swansong ‘Woe of the Crow’ (perhaps “Crowsong” makes more sense?). The drums and guitar hit together very much like a Tool song, though vocally I get a strong Three Days Grace vibe. At least during the verses. The chorus, especially in range but also in tone, has an Ian Thornley/Big Wreck vibe to it. Comparisons like this do not come lightly for songwriters that aren’t touring the world.

    Amazing and always enjoyable songwriting aside, this Ravi guy has a fucking voice. Any random three songs on this record run the gamut of impressive vocal techniques, musical dynamics, and emotive lyrics. I do not know if this would be considered a concept album by any means, but it has the creativity of a concept album in spades. A solid rock album if that’s what you’re after, but if you take the time there’s so much more here.

    • :

      Thanks for all the kind words Anthony. I was a drummer before I was anything else so I tend to approach most instruments like I would drums hence the percussive influence. :)

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